Progress on Proxearth Site

I spent a bit of time over the past few days thinking about and roughing out a new version of the Proxearth site. It will implement some aspects of the Proxearth climate change proposal and project, which uses the sustainable proximities approach and the ProxThink growth model, among other things.

One thing that will be moderately cool is you’ll be able to tweet from the site and have it add the Proxearth hashtags for you. And, view streams of tweets with those hashtags.

I also realized something I had written previously makes a pretty good tagline: “If sustainability doesn’t excite you, perhaps variety will.” And, I mapped the proxearth.org domain to the site.

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proxEarth – What You Can Do

(r] proxthink.com

The proxEarth climate change project and its “What You Can Do” section may interest you. The full proxEarth project is here. Here’s the idea behind the “What You Can Do” section: Many people have blogs, websites, and use social software sites (social networking, social bookmarking, photo and video sharing, etc.). Related to these, we could use some global collaboration standards which relate to the global challenge of climate change.

Some standards for tags and text on blogs, websites, and social software sites could turn the whole global Internet into a kind of Web 2.0 application for climate change. This could create the beginnings of a broad participation platform for information sharing and collaboration related to climate change. As a start, I’m suggesting a few simple standards for tags and text that leverage processes of the ProxThink growth model. The ProxThink growth model, especially when used in combination with the Internet, has the potential to be sustainable, flexible, healthy, fun and efficient. When used in searches, these tags and text markers can find pages, posts and other information related to climate change. Further, web pages can be created that track and update recent information which includes these tags and text markers, including tracking by geographic location. Even now, the Technorati and Delicious sites allow you to get an RSS feed of posts/pages tagged with tags of your choice.

The proxEarth tags and text markers use what we already have, which is search engines and huge numbers of blogs, websites, and users of social software sites. Anyone who has a blog or website or uses social software sites can participate, which is many millions of people. Not only does this give people ways to get involved, it creates greater visibility and awareness of what people from many regions and walks of life are doing to help slow, stop or reverse climate change, creating a self-reinforcing process that gets stronger, better and more connected and collaborative over time.

There is also a more general proxEarth proposal, which can be used for further developments, and upon which people can base their own innovations and implementations.

For the suggested proxEarth tags and text markers, and more information, see proxEarth.org.

Proxri Deal: As you find our relationship rewarding, proxri with the proximity in mind.